QTIX


The Tallis Scholars Music for The Sistine Chapel

Wednesday 26 October
Concert Hall, QPAC
1 hour 50 minutes
(including interval, subject to change without notice)
$79 - $115
A transaction fee of $7.20 applies.

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Following their triumphant appearances in 2013 and 2016, The Tallis Scholars return to Australia to perform a sublime program of sacred choral music from the great Renaissance masters including Josquin, Palestrina, Morales, Victoria and Allegri.

Led by director Peter Phillips, the program explores the elite world of these great composers with music once written for the revered Sistine Chapel Choir, including Allegri’s iconic Miserere.

For over 40 years, British early music vocal ensemble The Tallis Scholars have established themselves as the world’s leading exponents of Renaissance sacred music, creating a sound of astonishing beauty and blend.

Don’t miss these “rock stars of Renaissance vocal music” when they return to QPAC for one night only.

Presented by QPAC.
QPAC is proudly supported by Corporate Partner Mapei

Program

Morales: Regina caeli
Palestrina: Missa Papae Marcelli
Interval
Allegri: Miserere
Festa: Quam pulchra es
Carpentras: Lamentations
Josquin: Inter natos mulierum
Victoria: Magnificat Primi Toni à 8

About The Program

The Sistine Chapel Choir was the premier singing body in Rome throughout the renaissance period, and as such the one which every Catholic musician, from anywhere in Europe, aspired to join. All the composers to be heard here would have been in the orbit of this choir, receiving performances there, or taking part in them.

In this performance we explore the elite world of these great composers, from Josquin to Palestrina, Morales to Victoria, including Allegri’s iconic Miserere, with its high soprano C, once sung by a castrato.

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